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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear Experts,

For your amusement I am including 2 pictures of a recent purchase of mine. It had so much character that I could not let its mystery escape me. I am not an expert at all, and would welcome any possible identification attempts. As it has not arrived from France to US, I cannot determine if any markings remain.

It was found by a metal detectorist in chalk, in Bouchavense Wood (wherever that might be, I can't figure out), in Somme region of France. Maybe the history buffs would know when there were battles there.

I was struck by the preservation of the Luger despite being buried for almost 90 years. I am guessing that Chalk has a non-acidic pH, which neutralized any acidic attacks of the metal and even the wood.

Any comments at all would be welcomed! Thanks!

Sincerely,
Bill Jensen


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Discussion Starter · #2 ·

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The Somme experianced not just a little activity during that war. The Battle of the Somme lasted five months. On the first DAY the English lost 19000.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dear Collectors,

Just an update. I have removed most of the external rust, managed to free up parts such as the receiver from the frame, toggle, links, bolt, sear, etc. I used alkaline electrolysis, liquid wrench, and a hefty hammer, etc.

The grips were too weak to stand up to the impacts, and the trigger guard is bent. I'll try to fix these later. Right now I need to free up the trigger and the firing pin (may be a hopeless case).

It is amazing that the tolerances in the moving parts of the Luger actually preserved them from deterioration. I am having LOTS of fun with this project!

Sincerely,
Bill Jensen
 

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wdjensen123

Bill not to sure on what you require for identification purposes, only two firms made the artillery luger for WW#1 Erfurt and DWM strongly doubt that it could be a later Mauser Persian artillery but who knows.

Should you decide to lightly sandblast the front grip and be lucky enough to find a unit mark still stamped in the frame it is anyones guess.

This will be a tough one to nail down given the condition of the luger.

Good luck in your quest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Dear Lugerlou,

The front part of the grips are completely gone, no markings except a "10" on one of the grips, and on the bolt. It also says "ADEN" on the extractor. The exterior surface is eroded as much as 1/16 th inch, with some deeper pitting.

On the toggle there is a tiny pin on the knurled knob, does anyone know how to get it out? Also there is a slotted screw holding in the firing pin spring. Does it depress, and which way does it rotate to release it?

Thank you for any responses.

Sincerely,
Bill Jensen
 

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Bill,

The firing pin retainer is removed by depressing and turning a quarter-turn anti-clockwise.

The center toggle retaining pin is tough to get out under the best of circumstances, easily damaged; considering the condition of this gun you may want to reconsider if you -really- want to remove it.

--Dwight
 

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Bill

Your best bet is to check a few references for an exploded parts list and then you will be able to see where the pin goes, but like Dwight stated they are tough to get out at the best of times.

The extractor usually has the word Geladen on it and is visible when a round is in the chamber or when you remove it from the breechblock ( left side )

The number 10 on the back of one of your grips should be the last two digits of the serial number of the gun.
 

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wdjensen 123

Bill, I think you are doing one hell of a job with your luger, I for one at times get to wrapped up with trying to find the missing piece for a specific era and forget about the historical aspect of the luger.

Your old (dig find) is a true relic of WW#1 and worthy of it's place in history. Congratulations on all your hard work and resolve to get the job done.

Bill I am not a expert, just informed.
 
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