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IMG_2593.JPG IMG_2587.JPG IMG_2591.JPG IMG_2590.jpg IMG_2588.JPG IMG_2589.JPG I have this naval cleaning rod. Attached are pictures. I don't have lots of naval cleaning rods. Nor have I personally examined many naval cleaning rods. This cleaning rod is beautifully made. But I have never seen either an artillery or naval cleaning rod with centering holes in the ends of the wooden barrel. So I invite opinions as to the authenticity of this rod. Thanks. Jim
 

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Centering holes, or a pin? Does the handle turn on the shaft?
 

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Mike,
Norme asked me the same question. The barrel does spin on the shaft. I am interested in the 'pin' that you both mentioned. Where can I find info on this type of cleaning rod? Thanks. Jim
 

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Hi Jim,
There is some info in the Gortz/Sturgess books, either the green or red editions.
Norm
 

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Thanks Norm,
I am currently wading through the blue Gortz/Sturgess book but there seems to be little information on the cleaning rods. I assume the green or red editions have more or different information? Jim
 

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Hi Jim,
The green edition is titled “Pistole Parabellum” and the cleaning rod info is on page 1516 in volume III. I’m too lazy to look it up in the red edition but it’s titled “ Borchardt & Luger Automatic Pistols”.
They’re basically the same books but arranged differently.
Norm
 

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Norme,
Which set do you believe is easier to use or put another way which do you prefer? Thanks. Jim
 

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Hi Jim,
I’m a book guy, so I use the green edition. It’s printed on better paper, the illustrations are larger and clearer and the books open flat. The red edition is for younger computer types, it comes with a searchable CD (available separately from Simpson’s for under $40.00) and is said to contain some updates. In the few years since I’ve had it I’ve only found one, a rare accessory, described but not pictured in the green books, is illustrated in the later red edition.
Regards, Norm
 

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The Red Edition, much loved by this young 72 year old, is the best of both worlds. I keep the DVD version on my computer. I can find thinks instantly thanks to the index, and the photos on the screen are much better than either edition print edition. When I want to read it, instead of merely looking something up, then I grab a hard volume. I too love books.
 

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Jim, centering holes in the ends of the wooden barrel..not necessary for the barrel to be turned on a lathe, which they were.
I had a tool manufactured to cut these on a lathe. A steel bar with cutting edges and grooves, tapered on both sides. Makes a perfect barrel with a little attention paid on a spinning lathe. But to make these in any quantity, one cannot spin them individually.
I cut my shaft about 18 inches long. Any longer and you get some wobble as it spins. Then begin cutting each barrel as you go along, leaving a small space between each. At the end you have a long stick of barrels and simply cut each with a band saw. This leaves no centering holes in the ends of the wooden barrel.
Of course the Germans may have had a different method but that's how I did it.
 
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