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Today, I was the successful bidder on a Mauser Model 1934. I‘ll pick it up next week and post some photos. This is my first German WWII pistol. I‘ve been collecting US Militaria for a long time, and for the last several days, I’ve had my eye on the M1934. Needless to say, all afternoon I’ve been searching the internet regarding the M1934, and without a doubt, the best info I found was on the Luger Forum, so here I am. The on-line auction ad said the M1934 (SN 586129) is a Kreigsmarine model, but there‘s a lot to learn for me to verify that. However, the pistol is in remarkable shape. Where ever it spent the war, it led a very sheltered life. Anyway, I’m eager to post some photos and get feedback from you all. Any tips you can provide to get me started on learning about the M1934 would be appreciated.
 

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Today, I was the successful bidder on a Mauser Model 1934. I‘ll pick it up next week and post some photos. This is my first German WWII pistol. I‘ve been collecting US Militaria for a long time, and for the last several days, I’ve had my eye on the M1934. Needless to say, all afternoon I’ve been searching the internet regarding the M1934, and without a doubt, the best info I found was on the Luger Forum, so here I am. The on-line auction ad said the M1934 (SN 586129) is a Kreigsmarine model, but there‘s a lot to learn for me to verify that. However, the pistol is in remarkable shape. Where ever it spent the war, it led a very sheltered life. Anyway, I’m eager to post some photos and get feedback from you all. Any tips you can provide to get me started on learning about the M1934 would be appreciated.
I think photos would be a good beginning and I'm sure you will be get a lot if feed back on your prize from some very knowledgeable people.......especially Burgess, our go to man on Mauser pistols!
 

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Welcome to the forum. Yes, you have come to the right place to learn about firearms. There are a lot of knowledgeable people here. I do hope you were able to do some research PRIOR to winning your gun. The Kriegsmarine models are faked quite a bit. So please do post your pics and you will get some great advice. Congratulations on your first WWII pistol. They are addicting. I am anxious to see it!
 

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BryanJ, Welcome to the forum. I look forward to seeing your pictures and hope we can share good news about your Kreigsmarine marked example. In terms of describing what you have it is first a .32 Mauser pocket pistol, a.k.a. a 1934 model Mauser. The markings indicate usage so there is not a Kreigsmarine model per say. German Naval markings have a great deal of variation on the Mauser pocket pistols and designations for the variations have been created to define them. We should be able to at least provide you with the designation for the variation you have. Regards,
 

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Obviously, I am struggling with posting photos, not sure how they duplicated. From the minimal research I’ve done after the auction, I doubt it is a KM. But, the handgun is so nice, I’d have purchased it anyway. I‘ll pick it up tomorrow, and can take any additional photos anyone might want to see.
 

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I do not presently have a photo of the barrel lug, but the auction write-up says it includes the last two digits of the serial number and an Eagle over “N”. Also, I’ve read so much about these the last two days, did I read correctly that there is the traditional safety and a safety release button? I’ve read the instructions to field strip and they sound straight forward. But, I got a chuckle when I read that if you disassemble beyond field striping, you do so at your own peril.
 

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Bryan,(Welcome to the Forum!) you have a very nice conditioned 1934 commercial Mauser. My KM 1934 Mauser is not as nice as your Mauser. Mine came with the shoulder holster pictured......No doubt adapted by a GI. Your pictures are very good!
Thanks for showing,
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, I was probably overly excited about getting it. Yesterday, I went on-line and found a holster for it that was very nice. Seller was from Russia. He had a very extensive and positive record on eBay. we’ll see how that works out.
 

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Bryan, You have a very nice commercial 1934 Mauser. Commercial versions were distributed through authorized dealers and could only be purchased as a private purchase by individuals authorized to carry a gun such as party members and officers. This only differs from guns, which were procured by the government and therefore marked for police and the military with the appropriate markings such as Joe's gun which was marked for the Navy. To answer your additional question, yes the gun does have a safety catch and safety catch release. Your gun appears to be in great shape and you did well for your first purchase!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yoe. Thanks for the information. I just picked up the pistol and it actually looks better than in the photos. That is an interesting safety setup, I’ve never owned a handgun with a safety release button, but it seems to be an added safety feature, which seems ok. My initial impression is that the workmanship, finish, feel, is first class. So, what‘s the scoop on dry firing these, a real problem, or not? No getting around periodic dry firing when cleaning, anything to be concerned about? As a new member, I just wanted to say thanks for the welcome and feedback on the M34.
 

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It is a great one. All those Mauser pockets were very well made, look at the tight fitting of the one-piece wood grip and steel frame, you feel its quality.
 

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Bryan,
As you appear to have discovered your 1934 model is not KM marked. It is possible that the auction house mistook the Eagle/N for a naval marking. It is a proof mark that replaced the Crown/U proof mark around 1940. It indicates your example is from the end of production from 1940-1941.

As far as dry firing, it is absolutely necessary in order to release the tension on the striker spring for storage. A snap cap or wood dowel can be used to lessen the impact on the striker.

It is a very nice example, congratulations!
 
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