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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Sauer 38H that I am inquiring about was brought back from WWII by my dad. Sorry, I don't have any photos. It has a serial 289XXX. Does anyone know date of manufacturing? No proof mark on the left side of the trigger guard, anyone know why? Proof marks located on the right side of the frame, the slide, and the barrel all have an eagle with outstretched wings over an N. I assume N is for Nitrocellulous. Is this a police, military, or paramilitary issued pistol. The magazine does not have any serial numbers and my dad never had but one magazine. The holster has a stamped number on the underside of the flap only the last two digits are readable _ _ _ 43, any clues on the stamping? Grips are black with SuS on them and have 242/25R & 242/25L on inside. Inside has "H" stamped in a couple of places. Pistol has manual safety and the cocking/decocking lever. The pistol is in good condition, but shoots about 1.5 inches(or should that be 45 mm) to the right. I took it to the range, had a gunsmith check it first, after 24 rounds the barrel turned blue from heat, but the 60 year old mag and 40 year old ammo never failed. I had purchased a new box of ammo just in case the old stuff was bad. My dad used this as his nightstand and car pistol. I have requested Jan's book on interlibrary loan.
 

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You have a Sauer made in approximently 1941, one of the good ones using a high polish finish. The lack of a mark on the trigger guard indicates this pistol was made for the commercial market. Kind of unusual, since most Sauer's in this range went to the military and the police, but not uncommon, since these pistols were also offered for private sale, mostly to officers in the military and police, who had to provide their own pistols. The proof is the Eagle/N (E/N), begun about April 1,1940, and indicates a nitrocellulous proof. The H on most parts indicates the gun incorperated the "Hahnsincherung Heibel",the thumb safety required by the military. The numbers inside the grips indicate right and left panels, and should have a manufactures mark above the numbers. I'm at a loss to explain the holster, since the markings indicate it should be military, and a private purchase would have included a holster, but it's possible an officer would have had access to a military holster. All in all, a very nice early production Sauer, and certainly a keeper. Hpoe this information helps.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
sauer, thanks for the information on the pistol. It is definitely a keeper in that it belonged to my dad. Wish I knew how he obtained it, but he talks very little about his war experiences. Still has "flashbacks" around Christmas because of the Bastogne/Bulge experience. WTM
 

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Terry, although he doesn't talk about it much, you might want to broach the subject with him and talk about the people involved, eventually talking a bit about missions, by-passing any details.

As WW2 vets get older, well, we lose a lot of great information, just the day-to-day history of how soldiers dealt with situations and their friends.

But, you know him best and maybe it's best to let sleeping dogs lie?

Ed
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ed, I am very conscious of the knowledge that is literally being stolen by the Grim Reaper as large numbers of WWII veterans die daily. I recently was able to locate a veterans organization consisting of members of my dad's unit. Only he and the battery's cook are left. I hoped he would "come out" a bit but other than one conversation with his old buddy he still remains silent. The cook even called me and tried to get me to encourage or volunteer to drive my dad to the reunion last Sept. My dad was not interested. His only remark about the conversation was that the cook remembered the only two times my dad helped in the kitchen the battery came under heavy attack. My dad was a combat medic assigned to a AAA battery. Thanks for the concern. Terry
 

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I know what you mean about loosing our vets and their stories. It saddens me to think, each time I find a new pistol being sold by a vets widow or his estate, the history we have lost. We need to remember each and every one, and the sacrifices THEY made so that we can enjoy our freedom today.
 
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