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What is the deal on these? I see a lot of them around and most say "bring backs". But I never really see them mentioned in books about the WW2 German military pistols. Were they used? By who? Were they popular? Which caliber was authorized? They are kind of cheap prices for a nice one but I am not sure which one, if any, would be correct for a WW2 handgun collection. Thanks for any info, Dean
 

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the Ortgies wer manufactured right after WW1 until probably 1926 or there about. They never were a WW2 issue pistol. some have surfaced as being waffenampt marked but are undoubtedly fakes. Having said that they are nice well made pistols available in 3 calibers 6.35mm, 7.65mm. and 9mm short (380). Collected them for about 25 yrs. and realized there were many interesting variations. FWIW.....phredp
 

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Dean,

How is it going? I have two Ortgies, one in 6.35 and the other in 7.65. They are well made/crafted pistols (very excellent fit and finish) and it is claimed some were issued to our OSS people (spies) during the second world war. They were heavily exported from Germany into the US during the 20s and 30s. Total production of all calibers was around 250,000.


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6.35 caliber model on the bottom
 

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Production:
7,65 & 9 mm : about 263 000 pistols
6,65 mm : about 183 000 pistols

Total production of all calibres was about 446 000 pistols.
 

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Jan,

In the book German Handguns by Ian V. Hogg on page No.155 he says it is estimated, based on available serial numbers, that about 250,000 Ortgies in all calibers were produced. Just curious, where did you get your significantly greater number produced data from? Not saying your number is not accurate, I really don't know, but would like some additional research documentation if available.

Thanks, Lloyd in Vegas
 

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The Ortgies I own has a Czech military acceptance mark on it (H lion 24). The Ortiges was one of the pistols bought by the Czechs prior to the fullscale production of the Cz. vz.24 pistol. My pistol is a 7.65 mm Pistol and has the early grip emblem.

Robert
 

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Production of the Ortgies models startet in 1919 and ended exactly at the 30.9.1923 due to the inflation.
In this very short period of production a fantastic total of est. 446 000 pistols were made ( Jans data are correct ).
The German weapon expert H.J.Tillig writes (DWJ 2/85)that there were no gaps in the SN-line. He is in possession of the cal. 7,65 #262724 and observed the cal. 6,35 #182625.
Large quantities of Ortgies pistols were sold on the U.S. marked in 1922-1923.
In 1923 the factory sold the pistols for an unbelievable price to the States: 48000 pistols for $ 0,66 and 43000 for $ 0,75p.p.. The production value amounted to $ 2.25.

The Ortgies was never issued by the Germans but nevertheless very popular with officers as a self purchase pistol.
Pictured is a AKAH holster especially made for Ortgies pistols. Note the differences between the holsters ( on the left the AKAH Ortgies holster, on the right a AKAH Walther PP holster ).

Fritz


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Ortgies # 39053, third adress variation .
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Mag. for cal 7,65 and! 9mmk.
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Right side of the mag.
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Left side of the mag.
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Many Ortgies in both calibers were avaliable for purchase in Wis. I was told they were used as the big prize on punch boards in bars in the Milwalkee area durring the 1920s.
 
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