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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Please help me identify this pistol. Any information, such as the month it was manufactured, its value or to whom it was sold, is appreciated.

Luger S/42, 1938. The serial number is 8734 c, and is stamped “34” throughout. There is little or no wear on the pistol, other than perhaps some holster wear. From the breech and barrel, it appears not to have had been fired much. The wooden grips are in excellent condition. On the right side of the gun near the barrel, there are two nazi-eagle proof marks. The number under the eagle is hard to make out, but the first number is probably either an 8 or a 6, and the last number is probably either a 5 or a 3. Two the right of those two identical marks is another eagle, but not the standard nazi type, and further to the right, off the gun and on the barrel is a similar, but not identical eagle.
The magazine has a black plastic bottom piece, and is marked with a nazi eagle over 37 and TXO.

Thank you.
 

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According to Still, Third Reich Lugers, 113,800 lugers were made in 1938. They are estimated to have started at 400b and went through 4500n. So I would guess that 8734c would have been the first 18,334 made that first year. From memory, about the max being made was about 700 a day, so that is about 27 days, or what, 5th and maybe the 6th week in the month (taking into consideration sundays off).

The army acceptance stamps should be either an eagle 63 or eagle 83.

Ed
 

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Any information, such as the month it was manufactured, its value or to whom it was sold, is appreciated.

I am sure the month of manufacture could be ascertained by perusing one of Jan Stills excellent books. Mine are packed away for my move to AZ. Out of general curiosity, why would you care which month it was manufactured?

It's value is impossible determine without either good detailed closeup photo's or a hands on inspection due to the many variables involved. Lugers are like coins in this respect, everything hinges on condition and that can only be judged by someone who knows what he is looking at.

These Military pistols were not sold to anyone. They were issued to a unit and then to an individual Soldier. It is impossible to tell which unit unless the pistol is Unit marked. WW2 pistols were almost never unit marked to my knowledge. Even a small percentage of WW1 pistols were unit marked.

Ed, I know you don't drink beer, maybe you hit your head when you fell down the basement stairs... , I thought there were 4 weeks in a month...Maybe part of a 5th but a sixth? :)

Jerry Burney
 

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yah, yah, too much ice tea in my household.... should have said, 5th or 6th week in the production year...

I can understand why someone would want to know the month, although I have never figured out any of mine... Maybe I'll do so? :)

Might be coming on a visit to Arizona in a couple of months?

ed
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't know anything about Lugers, this is my first. I have a few Colts, and I've been able to determine the day they were manufactured. I suppose with Lugers, it doesn't matter.
 

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Ed, Come on down! I got a room all made up for ya...We'll go shooting!

Rob, "I suppose with Lugers, it doesn't matter." Does it matter with Colts? I was just curious to know why someone would want to know...I'm sure it is possible to extrapolate this information pretty accurately for some pistols . Why do you do it? Just to find out as much as you can? Thanks, Jerry
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Jerry, it's mostly just to find out as much as I can. I find that Colts typically sell for more when such details are given, particularly if the pistol is accompanied by archival documents. I don't know about Lugers, but if batches were shipped out in numerical order, it may be possible to trace to which company the Luger was issued. If it were sent to an SS group, it would almost certainly sell for more.
 

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Rob, I see....With Colt's I am sure a Colt Factory letter lends some authority and provenance. I don't know if it is worth the 200 bucks they charge in all cases but possibly.

There has been many years of diligent research on Luger pistols and nothing can be taken for granted. Most period German records of pistol deliveries have either not surfaced or were destroyed during the bombings. It is simply not possible to determine where a pistol ended up through existing records. Most people trying to get more for their pistol have to either fabricate a war story to add an aura of authenticity with which to excite the potential buyer or wait another few years and the price will go up of it's own accord. Good Luck! Jerry Burney
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Peter, it doesn't have a holster, I don't know if I'm interested in selling it yet, as it's my first Luger as is in nearly perfect condition. I was just wondering, did you place an ad in Canadian Access, asking to buy Lugers?
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have recorded a 1938-S/42 number 6719a and the lowest - b - block as 252b. Late January or early february of 1938 certainly looks good as a date of manufacture.
 
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