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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Can Mauro and Gerben provide more on C96 exports to the Soviet Union?

Alexander
Mauro explained that while sales records exist, they do not specify if 7.63 mm sold are large or small grip frames. Large numbers of 7.63 pistols went to both Russia and China. Regards,
 

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Yes, Mauser's accounting was rubbish. Perhaps on purpose. Also the internal product names were mostly absent. Mauser just called it the 'Armeepistole' without much consideration for technical or commercial variations.

The Bolo indeed was only know as the 'short' or 'officers version', although the 6-shot pistol was also referred to as the officers pistol.

I got 2 older reproductions of Wille's book on the C96 from 1896 and I also noticed he mentioned a 6mm version of the pistol amidst other ones.

Even after all these years, the C96 is still a researcher's nightmare.

Also remember that the stock was an option, deleted by several customers.

Congrats on the pistol and the stock. The grips look nice. Well done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I think it important to keep in mind that Mauser's record keepers had a different perspective than we do as collectors and that record keeping, at the time, met their needs not ours. I like the 'Armeepistole' term much better than 'Broomhandle' and also prefer 'Short' or 'Officers version' to 'Bolo'. I believe that creating more compact variations as an "Officers Model" was what intended to make the pistol more marketable for military contracts. Regards,
 
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Sometimes the real reason for certain variations turns out to be simple. When Mauser started developing and marketing the C96, the 6-loader was meant to be a direct replacement of the officer's revolvers by keeping the same weight as the officer's revolver. Mauser even experimented with a smaller caliber in order to reduce weight.

Also, in Paul Mauser's notebooks we see his obsession with weight. He was hardly interested in the technology of his competitors, but the weight of their guns was carefully noted in his notebooks.

Weight as a factor has been overlooked by many historians.
 
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
When it comes to arms, any soldier that has to carry it, will tell you, weight should always be a consideration. Regards,
 
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Also, in Paul Mauser's notebooks we see his obsession with weight. He was hardly interested in the technology of his competitors, but the weight of their guns was carefully noted in his notebooks.

Weight as a factor has been overlooked by many historians.
Weight was also an important factor in the pistol trials in Switzerland in 1892-1900. The report on the trials in the summer of 1897 mentions a new model of the C96 that weighed only 980g - unfortunately, there is no further information on this in the report. It could be the 6mm C96 (mentioned above by Gerben), which Wille mentions in his 1897 book (Richard Wille, Mauser-Selbstlader, Berlin 1897, page 46).
 

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The Bolo indeed was only know as the 'short' or 'officers version', although the 6-shot pistol was also referred to as the officers pistol.
Very interesting, I was not aware that the Bolo was called officer's version (or short version) back then. Learned something again.

Some questions:
  • what was the precise term for officer's version in German?
  • was the term officer's version used by Mauser or in other documents e.g. catalogues?
  • Gerben, could you possibly show us an original document on this?

Alexander
 

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I will look it up. I tend to remember futile details and forget where I read them 😂
 
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It is actually a bit more complicated as between 1924 and 1930 Mauser marketed the short version (250mm) 'bolo' as the standard Mauser ten-loader and the long version disappeared from the brochures and advertisements.

It did not mean Mauser stopped making long ones, they just hid it from the Interallied Control Commission.

So during the Weimar years there was no official need or willingness to pretend there were 2 versions at all.

Mauser was blowing a lot of smoke in those days, to conceal what they were actually doing.

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