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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! What is the highest and lowest serial number personally seen out there in the Romanian 1934s?
Has anybody ever seen a slide-mounted safety Beretta 1934?
Inquiring minds want to know!!
Okrana
 

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Dave Franchi, one of the most knowledgeable persons on Beretta pistols in the U.S., says the highest number he's ever encountered on a Romanian Contract Beretta M1934 is 36761, which for reasons unknown had a Waffenamt marking. Otherwise, the highest Romanian number in his extensive data base is 36143, which is mine. Can't help you on the slide-mounted safety question.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
quote:Originally posted by Webleyman

Dave Franchi, one of the most knowledgeable persons on Beretta pistols in the U.S., says the highest number he's ever encountered on a Romanian Contract Beretta M1934 is 36761, which for reasons unknown had a Waffenamt marking. Otherwise, the highest Romanian number in his extensive data base is 36143, which is mine. Can't help you on the slide-mounted safety question.
I'ii figure this out yet
I was interested in this topic I have a Romanian contract serial
number 37257 inspectors mark is CI or C1 in a circle
Will Beretta still send info on these guns?
 

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Dave Franchi, one of the most knowledgeable persons on Beretta pistols in the U.S., says the highest number he's ever encountered on a Romanian Contract Beretta M1934 is 36761, which for reasons unknown had a Waffenamt marking. Otherwise, the highest Romanian number in his extensive data base is 36143, which is mine. Can't help you on the slide-mounted safety question.
Mine is 38815!
 

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Hi! What is the highest and lowest serial number personally seen out there in the Romanian 1934s?
Has anybody ever seen a slide-mounted safety Beretta 1934?
Inquiring minds want to know!!
Okrana
About the slide mounted safety on 34, in may 1934 the italian Royal Army Firearms Factory (FARE) asked Beretta for a "special striker safety" on 1934 (before its adoption). Someone says that the request followed trials on a Walther PP pistol tested in 1932; evidently its safety had much impressed italian military authorities.
But they didn't think that this type of safety is veri desiderable but complex (and expensive). In the Beretta 1934, on the contrary, everything was concentrated on simplicity and strenght. This became an hotly disputed issue between Beretta and FARE as shown by some of the remaining correspondence of that time between the company, its Rome representative and FARE. Pietro Beretta wrote in one letter to FARE: "having said as much, we are nevertheless ready to accept the advice of those who, where it concerns the practical use of weapons in their all variety, have more experience and knowledge than we". Very tactful, although it sounds more like a wishful thinking. About twenty pistols with the slide mounted safety were modified and transferring the ordinary safety function to the lever on the slide made the safety disassembly on the frame superfluous. The situationcould have been solved after july 1934, with the "departure" of the person who was the principal (and only) supporter of this useless request. Half cock was, at least, Beretta's counterproposal in order to achieve a worthwhile improvement in the model 1934 safety. At the end of november 1935 the War Ministry decided to abolish the striker safety "replacing it by the trigger safety, also retaining the automatic striker safety2 (half cock position).
In all my life i've seen only one Beretta with the slide mounted safety, in the hands of a firearms collector of Bari (Apulia, southern Italy), but, of course, he'll never sell it.
About the range of serial numbers of Roumanian 1934, the italian governmente sold to Romanian one a lot of armaments, for the Italo-Romeno industrial cooperation and on 30 August 1940 Romania bought 61,000 model 1934 with 4 million calibre 380 cartridges, all to be delivered within seven months. But, like all 7-month births, also this one presented difficulties. Regarding pistols, only 40,000 could be delivered on account of the acute shortage of materials. For the same reason the supply of cartridges was refused. The first batch of 10,000 pistols was delivered by february 1941 and then, with monthly shipments of 5,000 pistols each, the 40,000 pistols were all delivered by august of 1941. The remaining 21,000 pistols, as far as known, have never been delivered. So model 1934 of Roumanian contract, as they are known by italian collectors, have serial numbers under 40.000 and, until now, none have ever been observed that indicate a year after 1941. It's probable that the relationship with Romania ended with the consignment of a further small batch of 1,000 or 1,500 pistols model 1934 supplied to the Ministry of Navy and Air Force (MAM) before the end of 1941.
I hope you'll find useful these informations.
 

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About the slide mounted safety on 34, in may 1934 the italian Royal Army Firearms Factory (FARE) asked Beretta for a "special striker safety" on 1934 (before its adoption). Someone says that the request followed trials on a Walther PP pistol tested in 1932; evidently its safety had much impressed italian military authorities.
But they didn't think that this type of safety is veri desiderable but complex (and expensive). In the Beretta 1934, on the contrary, everything was concentrated on simplicity and strenght. This became an hotly disputed issue between Beretta and FARE as shown by some of the remaining correspondence of that time between the company, its Rome representative and FARE. Pietro Beretta wrote in one letter to FARE: "having said as much, we are nevertheless ready to accept the advice of those who, where it concerns the practical use of weapons in their all variety, have more experience and knowledge than we". Very tactful, although it sounds more like a wishful thinking. About twenty pistols with the slide mounted safety were modified and transferring the ordinary safety function to the lever on the slide made the safety disassembly on the frame superfluous. The situationcould have been solved after july 1934, with the "departure" of the person who was the principal (and only) supporter of this useless request. Half cock was, at least, Beretta's counterproposal in order to achieve a worthwhile improvement in the model 1934 safety. At the end of november 1935 the War Ministry decided to abolish the striker safety "replacing it by the trigger safety, also retaining the automatic striker safety2 (half cock position).
In all my life i've seen only one Beretta with the slide mounted safety, in the hands of a firearms collector of Bari (Apulia, southern Italy), but, of course, he'll never sell it.
About the range of serial numbers of Roumanian 1934, the italian governmente sold to Romanian one a lot of armaments, for the Italo-Romeno industrial cooperation and on 30 August 1940 Romania bought 61,000 model 1934 with 4 million calibre 380 cartridges, all to be delivered within seven months. But, like all 7-month births, also this one presented difficulties. Regarding pistols, only 40,000 could be delivered on account of the acute shortage of materials. For the same reason the supply of cartridges was refused. The first batch of 10,000 pistols was delivered by february 1941 and then, with monthly shipments of 5,000 pistols each, the 40,000 pistols were all delivered by august of 1941. The remaining 21,000 pistols, as far as known, have never been delivered. So model 1934 of Roumanian contract, as they are known by italian collectors, have serial numbers under 40.000 and, until now, none have ever been observed that indicate a year after 1941. It's probable that the relationship with Romania ended with the consignment of a further small batch of 1,000 or 1,500 pistols model 1934 supplied to the Ministry of Navy and Air Force (MAM) before the end of 1941.
I hope you'll find useful these informations.
Hy, i've forgotten to write that my Roumanian contract 1934 has the serial number 39357: this means that it belongs to the last batch of 5,000 pistols, and was delivered in August 1941.
 

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Initial zero

I apologize and was wrong, Cristi; but remember that the initial zero in Beretta guns production for home until 1945 doesn't exist (except for the rare Beretta 1935 made by Armaguerra in 1944, with prefix "G")
 
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