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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've become curious about the R-within-W mark found on some Lugers. Costanzo identifies it as as a quality-control inspector's stamp found on 1938-1941 Lugers. Walter (1991) identifies it as a Mauser factory principal inspector.

Does anybody have any updated information on this mark?

--Dwight
 

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Dwight,
* Nothing new; except, as you know, this mark is also used on Mauser P.38's through the end of WWII. It is also seen on French directed P.38 assemblies, made at Mauser from remaining parts, after the war.
* Must add Warren Buxton's-P.38 Pistol-Vol.3-Pg 247 quote. In speaking of the "WR" mark and information received from an "authority and historian of Mauser and Luger pistols", Warren writes "During an interview (one of many) by him (the historian) with Herr August Weiss (foreman of Luger production at Mauser) this mark was identified as meaning 'Werks Revision' (factory revision). So, it should be referred to as the 'WR' mark, not 'RW'."
* The avitar below is a picture of the symbol in question.
 

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Ed & Jan,
* Deja vu?
* Both of these examples denote an earlier generation of fabrication than the Mauser P.08/P.38's we commonly see with this marking. IMO they suggest the "WR" mark was not isolated to Mauser; and, was a generic mark accepted by the Euro gunmaking industry for "a Factory Revision". Again IMO, it appears the mark signified a part which either incorporated or was reworked to the lastest revision of the design B/Print or Standard at some design change/transition point.
* This mark tends to be seen w/out pattern which suggests it was invoked when an "exception" situation demanded it. A deviation from B/Print fits this spurious ocurrence; but, it is not the only situational explanation. An end of line "repair", in-house sample check, or an analog to the Revision Commission's "C/RC" used on WW1 Erfurts come to mind. A number of theories (hardness test, etc.) about the meaning of this mark are frequently advanced.
* Be interested in your thoughts as I'm sure Dwight would be also. In the absence of documentation, I think the answer to Dwight's question above is: "No".
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Let me add here for the record another anachronistic use of the mark, on the bottom of the rear toggle piece of my Simson-reworked First Issue Military. It is conceivable that the part in question originated at Erfurt. Also, the style of the markis the same as Bob's avatar, not as on the Dreyse and the loading tool as pictured above.

--Dwight
 
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