Jan C. Still Lugerforums banner

21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
Here are more photos if anyone cares to give their opinion on grade
No two grading systems are alike. Here is where your gun would fall in the NRA Antique Grading. Fine-plus or Excellent-minus

EXCELLENT: All original parts; over 80% original finish; sharp lettering, numerals, and design on metal and wood; unmarred wood; fine bore.

FINE:
All original parts; over 30% original finish; sharp lettering, numerals, and design on metal and wood; minor marks in wood; good bore.
My own grading system would call it 60-70% finish with high point finish loss and moderate to heavy patina on grip straps. Stocks with worn points on checkering and some compression. Bore, unknown.

I would call it Good to Good-plus. It is not close to Fine-Excellent, IMO.

And after good pictures like you have provided, the market would settle a value all by itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,179 Posts
The first block produced for the military each year prior to and during WW1 will not have a suffix letter; i.e., 1 ~ 10000 no suffix. The next block will be 1a ~ 10000a followed by b, c etc. There are exceptions as the first Lugers procured for military use prior to WW1 have commercial type numbering.

Prior to and during WW1, production for each year began with 1 ~ 10000 no suffix and continued through the alphabet until the end of the year was reached. At the beginning of the new year, it began once more with a no suffix run. At no time during WW1 production were all letters used.

Following WW1, 1920 & 1921 military and police pistols began each year with a no suffix block followed by suffixes a & b. As commercial production exceeded serial number 90000, it raised the concern that they may have to use six digit serial numbers which they did not want to do. Thus, at approximately 92000 commercial serial number, they began using a suffix letter for both military and commercial production. These are commonly known as "alphabet commercial" Lugers. While it is commonly accepted that combined production began at 2000i - the equivalent of 92000 if the suffix method was applied - Gortz & Sturgess note in chapter 10 that they believe the change began with serial number 1i as i block serial numbers as low as 74i have been noted. They also note that the entire i block was committed to commercial production.

The alphabet production did not revert to a no suffix block at the beginning of each year but continued through the alphabet year after year. Mauser seems to have continued that practice when they began production.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member 2012
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
What about the numbers inside the sideplates in 1936? Like this Luger, my 1936 S/42 has no inside sideplate number.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,501 Posts
This plate is from my "G" date (1935). The number inside is in the same position that DWM put theirs. It might be in this position on your very early 1936 Luger. Later Mauser moved the position of the number to the flat portion of the inside. Note that my "G" date has been reblued. This one is stamped "12" inside (the "1" is very light) and corresponds to the first digits of the serial number +1.
 

Attachments

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,501 Posts
By 1937, Mauser had started putting the number on the flat:

View attachment 634429

In this year, the number inside matched the first digit(s). In later years it was the first digit(s) plus 1.
 

·
Gld Bullet Member 2012
Joined
·
579 Posts
By 1937, Mauser had started putting the number on the flat:

In this year, the number inside matched the first digit(s). In later years it was the first digit(s) plus 1.
Marc - Not necessarily - I have an excellent 1936 with original finish and no number inside the sideplate, and I'm pretty sure the sideplate is original to the gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
I currently own two 1936 Mauser Parabellums...

The grip panels look and fit snug as originals...neither set of grips are stamped to the Luger's last two serial number numerals...and both sideplates are stamped accordingly...(interior of sideplate)...

Edward
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Thanks for all the comments
I learned a lot about my pistol and this knowledge has helped me to be able to enjoy it more
Shoedog
 

·
Copper Bullet Member
Joined
·
840 Posts
Here is another one with no numbers on the inside. Fit and finish of the sideplate look original to me. The fonts are very distinctive and match the rest of the gun.
Early 1937 S/42
 

Attachments

21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top