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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of weeks ago I posted some pictures of the Colt M1917 offering so I thought I would follow up that post with pictures of the more elegant S & W large bore military WWI era wheel gun.

The revolver pictured is a late issue about half way through total production (serial number 82640). A total of around 170,000 S & W M1917s were produced.

This is an original non refinished revolver. It has much slimmer lines or profile than the much more robust and chunky (clunky) looking Colt M1917. The barrel on the S & W model is much slimmer in profile than the Colt offering. The biggest difference though is the finishing and polishing of the exterior sufaces of the S & W versus the dull blue less polished finish of the Colt model. The S & W looks more like one produced for the commercial market and is beautiful to behold. Sort of like a pre WWII Colt Model 1911A1 government model. Once you have seen one of those up close nothing else quite compares!

The revolver acceptance markings are those associated with both a middle and late issue model even though over 60,000 more S & W M1917s would still be produced after this specimen. This one is sort of a transition middle to final issue acceptance markings model. This one has both a middle issue Springfield Flaming Bomb final acceptance stamp and also the late issue SA Eagle Head/S6 final acceptance stamp. Both are found on the left side of the pistol frame--see pictures.

The model 1917s used a military serial number on the butt (this one again is 82640) and this same number on S & W M1917s is found under the barrel (to the rear of the United States Property mark) and on the rear of the cylinder. Matching numbers (assembly numbers in this case 35578) are found on the inside of the cylinder crane and inside the cylinder crane recess of the frame.

Both the S & W M1917 and the Colt Model 1917 served with much distinction during the first World War. They were both reliable to the extreme and used the much respected .45 acp round. The half-moon clip ammunition arrangement will always be remembered when the M1917 is discussed. The model 1917 revolver was a very good trench warfare sidearm and served with very oustanding results well into WWII.

This one also has a WWI lanyard and a Rock Island Arsenal 1917 dated holster.
Download Attachment: S&W Army M1917 Left Side.jpg
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Download Attachment: S&W Army M1917 Right Side.jpg
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Download Attachment: S&W Army M1917 Rig.jpg
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Download Attachment: S&W Army M1917 Holster Rear.jpg
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Download Attachment: S&W Holster Marking and Date.jpg
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Download Attachment: S&W Army M1917 Grip Butt Serial.jpg
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Download Attachment: S&W Army M1917 Flaming Bomb Proof.jpg
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Springfield Flaming Bomb Final Acceptance stamp
Download Attachment: S&W Army M1917 Inspector Mark.jpg
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SA Eagle Head/S6 Final Acceptance Stamp
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dean,

Thanks for the nice words. I know US military revolvers don't get a lot of notice/play on this board, so thanks for posting. I do love these big bore .45 caliber revovlers--there is just something about that big hole in the end of the barrel muzzle that intrigues me. They were great revolvers in a caliber that got the job done!
 

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quote:Originally posted by Lloyd in Vegas

Dean,
Thanks for the nice words. I know US military revolvers don't get a lot of notice/play on this board, so thanks for posting.
I used to have a 1917 S&W, traded or sold it about 15 years ago. I have the chance to pick up one, refinished in park for $350. I am tempted, nothing better than a 45 in the hand for power.

Nice set up Lloyd, you have a hell of a nice colelction!

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ed,

Thanks for your nice comments! I have a Colt M1917 I shoot every now and then and it is FUN. It is very accurate with almost any .45 acp load I care to shoot in it. I don't think I will ever not have a M1917 in my collection. I had one of the Brazilian M1917s in my collection for a number of years and I finally traded it off for something else. It was a fine shooter and a fun gun to go big bore plinking with. I can't think of a better more reliable home defensive hand gun.
 
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