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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
My first post here is not about a P-08 but this 38 H. I am guessing that the receiver has been chromed post war (it is attracted to magnets) and that the holster is also post war. Can anyone give me any information about this gun? Should there be firing proof marks on the barrel? There is a waffenamt on the right rear slide barely visible in the picture. I don't have any date charts so an approximate year of manufacture would be great. I am happy to be a part of this august forum. Thanks. John
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John, I can tell you that due to the eagle over N stamp on the left tang just below the serial number that it was after Jan 1940 but I'm not sure about the serial number. Maybe late 42 or early 43... because your slide still has the full legend instead of the later variation which reads just "CAL 7.65" it may be earlier.
To tell if the slide matches the serial number remove the slide from the frame and check for the last three digits at the muzzle end of the slide on the underside, also can check if the bolt is orginal by looking at the backside of the bolt within the slide itself.
In case you don't know to remove the slide simply drop the mag, pull that little tab on the top part of the trigger guard down, then pull the slide all the way back and lift up then let the slide ride forward coming off the barrel.
Luckily for you there are those far more knowledgeable than myself on this forum and they will be able to provide you with a more precise production date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
John, I can tell you that due to the eagle over N stamp on the left tang just below the serial number that it was after Jan 1940 but I'm not sure about the serial number. Maybe mid to late 42 or early 43... because your slide still has the full legend instead of just cal 7.65 it may be earlier.
To tell if the slide matches the serial number remove the slide from the frame and check for the last three digits at the muzzle end of the slide on the underside, also can check if the bolt is orginal by looking at the backside of the bolt within the slide itself.
In case you don't know to remove the slide simply drop the mag, pull that little tab on the top part of the trigger guard down, then pull the slide all the way back and lift up then let the slide ride forward coming off the barrel.
Luckily for you there are those far more knowledgeable on this forum than myself and they will be able to give you more precise of a production date.
Thank you so much. I removed the slide and found the last three digits of the serial number there and on the bolt. There is an eagle over N at the tip of the barrel as well.
 

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The holster is postwar, probably Walther PP. The frame has been chromed, not nickeled because a magnet will not stick to nickel. The breechblock pin is in backward indicating someone has been "inside" of the slide. The acceptance on the trigger guard appears to be an Eagle C, but the photos are not definitive to be certain about that. Lastly, the pistol, 357283, was already in my database without any mention of the frame being chromed. Perhaps that was done since I listed the serial number in months or years past. Your Sauer was made in late November 1942. Regards, Jim Cate, author of the 3 Sauer reference books.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The holster is postwar, probably Walther PP. The frame has been chromed, not nickeled because a magnet will not stick to nickel. The breechblock pin is in backward indicating someone has been "inside" of the slide. The acceptance on the trigger guard appears to be an Eagle C, but the photos are not definitive to be certain about that. Lastly, the pistol, 357283, was already in my database without any mention of the frame being chromed. Perhaps that was done since I listed the serial number in months or years past. Your Sauer was made in late November 1942. Regards, Jim Cate, author of the 3 Sauer reference books.
Jim, many thanks for this information. The trigger guard stamp appears to be an eagle over 37. I would like to know how to reorient the breechblock pin. I am also curious about the chrome; is that a postwar thing, perhaps by a police force? Where can I find your books?
Best,
John
 

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It was not uncommon for GI's to dress up their war trophies by having them chromed. Most usually, the whole gun was refinished.

Your pistol looks much more purposefully refinished, as it appears that the frame was completely stripped, and then reassembled with pins and small parts.

Usually these post-war refinish processes detract from value and collector interest. And I believe this to be the case for your 38H. But I have to say that it looks kind of cool in its two-tone appearance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you. I figured if was refinished but the holster that came with it makes me wonder if it was a post war police refinished pistol. I got it for a very reasonable price and it shoots great.
 

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You're right, they make fantastic shooters with their DA/SA triggers, they even have a little loaded chamber indicator; a pin that sticks out the back of the slide.

You may have found this out but that lever on the left side of the frame is a de-cocker but it can also charge the hammer too, making it ready to fire. Only time I've seen a dual-purpose lever like that!

I like shooting mine, just be careful if the grips are orginal they are prone to cracking, some reproduction ones on ebay are a good alternative. Looks like your might be replacements so no worries, hard to tell for sure though
 

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Jim, many thanks for this information. The trigger guard stamp appears to be an eagle over 37. I would like to know how to reorient the breechblock pin. I am also curious about the chrome; is that a postwar thing, perhaps by a police force? Where can I find your books?


John, the best and easiest way to reorient the breechblock pin is to take a wooden dowel that is the same diameter and drive out the pin to the right side of the slide. Once it is out take the pin and drive out the dowel to the right side of the slide also. DO NOT take the pin out without doing this with a dowel or steel pin that is exactly the same size. The chrome is a postwar thing by some GI here in the states. The German police would have never done that. My books have long since been sold out. You might find one at a gunshow or a bookshop if you are lucky. Good collecting, JIM
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Jim, many thanks for this information. The trigger guard stamp appears to be an eagle over 37. I would like to know how to reorient the breechblock pin. I am also curious about the chrome; is that a postwar thing, perhaps by a police force? Where can I find your books?

John, the best and easiest way to reorient the breechblock pin is to take a wooden dowel that is the same diameter and drive out the pin to the right side of the slide. Once it is out take the pin and drive out the dowel to the right side of the slide also. DO NOT take the pin out without doing this with a dowel or steel pin that is exactly the same size. The chrome is a postwar thing by some GI here in the states. The German police would have never done that. My books have long since been sold out. You might find one at a gunshow or a bookshop if you are lucky. Good collecting, JIM
Many thanks for your expertise, Jim. I will watch out for your books.
Best,
John
 

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"The chrome is a postwar thing by some GI here in the states. "
Not always true. There were significant immediate Post War Europe opportunities for chrome and nickel plating in Germany and France ,available to GI's. Fully in agreement this was a postwar GI doing.
Jeff
 
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