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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been an attentive ‘student’ of the forum and appreciate the wealth of knowledge of members! So, in advance, “Thank you!”

In addition, I would appreciate feedback to learn more about my new acquisition.

Transition variant:
P.38 byf 43 sn 2371 g block.
All matched.
However, I suspect it has been dipped (frame - locking block, pin & springs are signatories.)

Attaching images to add to collective information and reference.

Thanks
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Your suspicions are correct in that it has been dipped. Mauser and Walther trigger springs, locking blocks and locking block pins were always in the white. It appears the grips it is wearing are Posselt manufacture, which were actually made for Spreewerk pistols. AEG (Allgemeine Electricitats-Gesellschaft) grips would be what you seek. They show up for sale every now and then on eBay and Gunbroker. They are distinguished from the Posselt grips on the exterior by having 6 broken lines around the grip screw as opposed to the 5 on Posselt grips. The interior markings are also different on AEG grips. You could also use a pair of post war reproductions that are quite widely available. Nice looking pistol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Your suspicions are correct in that it has been dipped. Mauser and Walther trigger springs, locking blocks and locking block pins were always in the white. It appears the grips it is wearing are Posselt manufacture, which were actually made for Spreewerk pistols. AEG (Allgemeine Electricitats-Gesellschaft) grips would be what you seek. They show up for sale every now and then on eBay and Gunbroker. They are distinguished from the Posselt grips on the exterior by having 6 broken lines around the grip screw as opposed to the 5 on Posselt grips. The interior markings are also different on AEG grips. You could also use a pair of post war reproductions that are quite widely available. Nice looking pistol.
@Daniel76
Thank you!
Great observation on the grips! Rather than trade them out, perhaps I’ll be on the lookout for the AEG grips and simply preserve the current for future Spreewerk pistol.

Learning how little I know… I just searched for a reference and found a fairly comprehensive assessment hear for a little light reading:

Polymer Plastic Compounds in Germany and P.38 Grip Plates up to 1945
© Wolf Roth Berlin, Germany January 2010

Thank you again!
 

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I would leave the grips on this (most likely) Russian Capture. Next, I would study for a few weeks, at least. Then I would seek an all original P.38. And the obsession begins. You may end up with fourteen of them....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would leave the grips on this (most likely) Russian Capture. Next, I would study for a few weeks, at least. Then I would seek an all original P.38. And the obsession begins. You may end up with fourteen of them....
Thanks Martin08!
Agreed… got the bug 😁

Perhaps the current state of this P.38 is as ‘authentic’ today as it was the day it left the Mauser facility. Considering the difference between a baby and a 79 year old. One is what you start with and the other reflects the journey it has been on ever since! It can only tell the tale if we are willing, attentive and informed to achieve understanding. Otherwise, I suppose we are only projecting what we want to see and understand.

Learning like a sponge and eyes peeled for the next! 😆😃
 
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