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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All - Are there generally accepted dates or date ranges when the polish and finish on the Walther P.38 began to decline due to wartime exigencies (or otherwise)? Assuming so, what do you consider those dates or date ranges to be?

In other words, if I want the prettiest / highest polish / best finish war / pre-war Walther P.38, what date range(s) should I look at?

And same question for what Spreewerk P.38?

Thank you,

JGW
 

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WWII firearms, holsters, insignia, badges, Japanese swords, and other militaria
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JGW,

If you're looking for the best quality finish for the P38s, you Have to get the earlier versions, such as (in order);

  • Pre war commercial HP
  • Walther Zero series (01-013000.)
  • 480 code Walther
  • AC no date
  • AC 40 added
  • AC40
  • early AC41. After that they start to decline.

For Spreewerk, only the very early ones will have a nice polished finish. So look for an early one, no letter block.

Good luck,
Matt:cool:
 

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All I collect are Spreewerk pistols (not counting guns I only have one of), and I would tell you that generally, you can occasionally find really nice finishes all the way through about the 'b' block. The trick though is finding them. The first 10,000 pistols (with no letter block) are again, generally nicer than those following them. But...I have several of the first 500 Spreewerks that were assembled with Walther small parts, and one of them shows a very distinctive lack of finishing on the slide, whereas I have an 'a' block that is as nicely finished as any of my very early ones. I have about a dozen no-letter block pistols, and most of them are very well done. On rare occasions you can even find one way out there in the middle of the alphabet with a really nice finish. By the last 18 months of the war, however, they were clearly far more interested in getting functioning pistols out the door. Machine marks abound, and many collectors find these rough finishes most intriguing.

Absolutely nothing beats the early Walther finishes (zero series, no-dates, etc). They are magnificent pieces of workmanship, just like the very early K98k's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All - Thank you for your input. I always appreciate that forum members will take time to answer questions which, to most of you, are very basic.

Best regards,

JGW
 
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