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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have searched high and low on the web for any reference to a 3" barreled Webley Mark VI with no luck whatsoever - I only find 6" references. Judging from the front site, the pistol appears to have been manufactured like this. I am currently serving in Iraq, and this is where I found the pistol. What is the basic story of this 3" model? What is it? Why am I having so much trouble finding details on it? I'm told that a 3" Mark VI was never made. Does the pistol I am holding in my hand actually exist, or am I imagining it? :)


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Pistol details:

Removable front site; appears to be double action only; Broad Arrow on all visible parts; ''WEBLEY MARK VI PATENTS 1919'' on frame just below cylinder; ''MARK VI'' and ''19'' on barrel directly above cylinder; cylinder ordnance stamp (six locations) of crown, ''GR'', crossed somthing, and ''P''; barrel ordnance stamp same as previous and also stamp crown, ''4M'' and script ''B''; frame ordnance stamp on trigger guard crown, ''B'', and ''88''; frame ordnance stamp crown, ''N7'' (hard to read), and script ''B'' (near barrel catch); barrel ordnance stamp of crown, ''1Y'' and script ''B'' on underside of barrel; serial number of ''436076'' stamped on cylinder, frame, and underside of barrel; stamp on backstrap/backside of grip ''7-20.S.P.R.1.INF. 14''.
 

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While I am unable to answer your question, might I ask if you have contacted the British forces there in Iraq. They might have a lead or contact in Britian that might assist you. Good luck !!!
 

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Brian, welcome to the forum... In the back of my mind I seem to remember the "bull-dog" version, but I could be mixing up guns. Ian Hogg's books might cover it, but my books are in storage.

You are in an interesting position, having been military you know how the system works, but being a civilian sometimes more latitude in "looking" around seeing stuff. Lots of British arms were seized and/or sold to the middle east after WW2, so I would guess that is a possibility of where it came from.
I remember seeing enfields in pictures in Persia, which is not far away, also in afganistan in Guns and Ammo in the 60's of a luger that was made by hand, and was a very good copy.

Ed
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't know yet on bringing it back. I'm no longer military, but instead a Federal civilian and not under the DoD rules. I'll do the ATF paperwork like anyone else. If that doesn't work, this odd weapon will probably fade into oblivion.
 

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About 20 years ago, a bunch of .455 MK VI revolvers similar to yours were sold as Irish police surplus. Post WWI contract, as I remember. So, I suppose short barrels must have been an option. Unless you find some broad arrow markings, I would suppose you have a commercial police revolver.

Nice find.

Good luck over there!

Best regards,

Greg
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm back in the States now, and left the revolver behind an another unsolved mystery. It had several broad arrow stamps - pretty much on every part. It also had what looked like a unit designation on the backstrap of the grip.
 
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