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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
I have this gun that hasn't been touched in at least 20 years, can anyone tell me anything about it and or its value? Also should I clean it or leave it as it is?
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Discussion Starter #4
Just curious, how much this one cost 20 years ago?
No clue, when my grandfather passed I boxed it up and didn't think much about it until recently. He hadn't touched his guns for 12 years and it's been in a box for 8.
 

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The frame is Mauser from the late 1930's or early 40's while the upper is post WW1 DWM made in the early 1920's. It's obviously mismatched with parts from at least four different guns and the large "X" on the left side of the receiver indicates a Russian capture gun. It was probably matching when captured but has been cobbled together to make a functioning gun to be sold for hard cash.

If it has a good bore and functions correctly, I'd estimate $700.
 

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The frame is Mauser from the late 1930's or early 40's while the upper is post WW1 DWM made in the early 1920's. It's obviously mismatched with parts from at least four different guns and the large "X" on the left side of the receiver indicates a Russian capture gun. It was probably matching when captured but has been cobbled together to make a functioning gun to be sold for hard cash.

If it has a good bore and functions correctly, I'd estimate $700.
Should I leave it alone, or disassemble, clean and see if it fires?
 

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Field strip, clean, lubricate, reassemble and fire it. Many seem to think Winchester White Box 9mm works well in Lugers but finding it may present a problem unless you already have some.
 

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People perform disassembing, cleaning, shooting etc, mainly because they enjoy those processes. You don't have to ... Unless you enjoy those too. That has nothing to do with value. No need to force yourself doing anything if you don't have interest.

Shooting it cost something due to ammo consumption, and ammo is not cheap these days. I bet you know that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Field strip, clean, lubricate, reassemble and fire it. Many seem to think Winchester White Box 9mm works well in Lugers but finding it may present a problem unless you already have some.
Forgive my lack of knowledge, will any 9mm work in it for the purpose of test firing?

Any videos or diagrams of the unit on disassembly?
 

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Forgive my lack of knowledge, will any 9mm work in it for the purpose of test firing? Any videos or diagrams of the unit on disassembly?
Try this:

WRT cartridges, avoid +P cartridges. They are too powerful and could damage your Luger. Also avoid those marked NATO. Most other normal ROUND NOSE 9mm cartridges should work OK.
 

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Certainly an interesting mix. Who knows where that was cobbled together. The IA-CO SAC importer mark means at least the frame didn’t get here until fairly late; not a war bringback. Inter American of Sacramento imported surplus arms from all over the world, Europe, China, Israel, and South America, and sold them wholesale and through their retail outlet Old Sacramento Armory.
 

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Certainly an interesting mix. Who knows where that was cobbled together. The IA-CO SAC importer mark means at least the frame didn’t get here until fairly late; not a war bringback. Inter American of Sacramento imported surplus arms from all over the world, Europe, China, Israel, and South America, and sold them wholesale and through their retail outlet Old Sacramento Armory.
Interesting, what the parts of this gun have seen and where they have been is somewhat intriguing.
 

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Good video.

While I tried to put take down lever back on byf, it was hard - aligning the lever pin to the frame hole on the right side of the frame under strong tension of lever spring is hard.

I tried a rubber mallet tapping the lever.... did not work. The gun had to be put aside in disassembled mode for a few months.

Later on, I bought a small U-shaped clamp from Home Depot. By clamping the lever and gradually increasing the static pressure, at the same time, use a screwdriver to micro-adjust pin position in the frame, the lever pin finally falling into the frame hole.

This design had this issue. If German had relieved the end of lever pin, it would be much easier. Their stuff was always designed in very tight fit, sometimes could be hard to handle.
 

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Good advice above - for in cleaning, use less than more. You can easily take it down to basic parts (major parts) and then clean with oil and rags, I personally use 0000 steel wool, but 0000 bronze wool is even better, always use some oil, clean, then wipe down with clean, lint free rags.
I was thinking a fairly standard 'capture' firearm, with the 'x' and the bottom / top mostly matching, what throws me off is the 'germany stamps'. The germany stamp was pre-war and not seen as an export stamp on post war (WW2) lugers, as the companies making them were out of biz.
I would say this was put together here in the states from two guns. If it shoots, then it doesn't matter as much, because then its a luger.
Any 9mm (not +P) 115 grain will work. Shorter or too long bullets cause issues, but any of the standard loads seem to work fine, but if you can get a few brands to try, thats always good, just harder to buy right now.
 

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what throws me off is the 'germany stamps'. The germany stamp was pre-war and not seen as an export stamp on post war (WW2) lugers, as the companies making them were out of biz.
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This puzzled me too, as the “Germany” (pre-war) and the InterAmerican import mark (post-1986) are both found on the same part, the grip frame. So while the top with the capture X may come off a standard military WW II capture, the frame may be commercial and have some odd history like a re-import from South America.
 

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This puzzled me too, as the “Germany” (pre-war) and the InterAmerican import mark (post-1986) are both found on the same part, the grip frame. So while the top with the capture X may come off a standard military WW II capture, the frame may be commercial and have some odd history like a re-import from South America.
Welcome to the forum!
Just to narrow your theories: there isn't any South American connection here.
Contrary to Alvin, I think that disassemble is part of the game. It's like having a car and not knowing how to check the oil, water, etc.
Let us know how it performs. If it shoots and cycle properly I would say $800.
But I would keep it - Lugers are attention grabbers in the range. You are going to be the coolest guy there!
Be careful: Lugers are highly addictive.
Greetings,
Douglas
 

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Welcome to the forum!
Just to narrow your theories: there isn't any South American connection here.
I think you’re mistaking me for the owner of the gun. I’d also be interested in alternative explanations for the two stampings. The US was to my knowledge the only country requiring a country-of-origin marking for imported firearms back then, but I could be wrong on that. And US distributors certainly ran a lively export business southward, so it seems a viable hypothesis, given that the frame didn’t re-enter the country until after the new style of importer markings were required.
 

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Contrary to Alvin, I think that disassemble is part of the game.
Actually, I did not say he should not do it. I said, do it only when have interest. Personally, I had great interest in doing that, so I take almost all guns down to bottom level, in the process, thinking things like, why such a groove designed here, why the maker drill a hole here without obvious intention... Things like that... The worst nightmare in the process was dropping the parts box on the floor accidentally, .... it happened a few times in the past...

On cars, well, I don't have any interest. Any car. I only like small items, car is too big for me. So I never disassemble anything in a car..
 

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I think you’re mistaking me for the owner of the gun. I’d also be interested in alternative explanations for the two stampings. The US was to my knowledge the only country requiring a country-of-origin marking for imported firearms back then, but I could be wrong on that. And US distributors certainly ran a lively export business southward, so it seems a viable hypothesis, given that the frame didn’t re-enter the country until after the new style of importer markings were required.
OK, sorry for my mistake. I confused you with the OP indeed.
However, although the surplus dealer had done a lot of aquisitions in Latin Americ until late 180s and early 1990s, I can say with a good amount of certainty, that this guns wasn't part of these deals.
This kind of configuration - specially using Mauser frames - wasn't adopted by any police or military force in South America. Besides that, the height of the Luger in that market was before the World War I.
As said above I leaning toward the theory that this Luger was assembled in USA. But that's just me.
Greetings,
Douglas.
 
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