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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

First-time poster... I'm writing with a mystery.

I'm trying to help a friend track down a Mauser Luger and holster that his grandfather brought back from WWII, and which he sadly pawned when he was in a hard spot back in 2011. His grandfather took it from a German officer who surrendered to the 84th Infantry Division in the spring of 1945-- and although I don't know it, the German officer's name is inscribed on the holster. I have the Bring Back papers for the gun-- the S/N is 459 and I believe the model is a P08 / S42. It was pawned in Denver, Colorado.

Does anyone know anything about this gun? Does anyone have any ideas about how to track it down? An expert I should talk to? Or prominent collector of WWII lugers?

Thanks all!
 

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I saw that you had posted this twice, so deleted one, I think they were the same wording.

Anything is possible, but thousands of collectors are not on the forums, or they are only part time visitors. I would be that your sn includes a suffix (letter) with it, and a date of the luger.
Like I said, someone might have it, but chances are slim. Heck, I have sold guns I wish I had never sold, usually they are gone, gone, even if you know who you sold it too.

An S/42 is probably 1939 or 1940

but for legal purposes, as an example, say my 1939 police, I would say, it is a Mauser, 1939 S/42, sn 8349t
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey, thanks for your response! Yeah, I know that the chances are super slim. But I just want to do all I can! I don't know the date-- the wasn't on the papers-- but there was no letter after it. Just 459.
 

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Contact the pawn shop if it's still in business. They might have a record of who they sold it to? Might not give it to you though. Might be some sort of start? You could get lucky.
 

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As mentioned on the other forum, follow Jerry's advice above. It's about the only path to locating it.

The capture papers often did not properly and completely identify firearms. It's possible that there was no serial number suffix, but unlikely. The no-suffix block of 10,000 occurred once every 270,000 firearms.
 

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If the pawn shop is still around, I'd start with them. They had to keep a record of the pistol, coming and going. If you have the capture papers, they may be willing to try to contact the buyer for you. Your best bet is if you can persuade them to help. They shouldn't be willing to disclose the buyer without his permission, but they may be able to give him your info.

Frankly, it's a real slim chance, but better than nothing
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If the pawn shop is still around, I'd start with them. They had to keep a record of the pistol, coming and going. If you have the capture papers, they may be willing to try to contact the buyer for you. Your best bet is if you can persuade them to help. They shouldn't be willing to disclose the buyer without his permission, but they may be able to give him your info.

Frankly, it's a real slim chance, but better than nothing
Thanks, Mike. Hey, can I ask-- what kind of insignia is that on your hat in your photo? I feel like I recognize it but I don't know from what...
 
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